Education

01

Online Course

All the necessary information to smoothly transition to Augma bone cement.

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02

Webinars

Watch ABCA webinars and get complementary CE credits.
 
 
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03

Protocols 

Learn the protocols that are changing the concept of traditional bone grafting.
 
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04

Clinical Cases

A range of clinical cases by ABCA Bone Cement Experts. Sinus Lift, Lateral Augmentation, Socket Grafting, and more.

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05

Clinical Support

Fill up the clinical case support form and one of ABCA Bone Cement Experts will contact you shortly 

 

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06

Clinical Literature

Review, critical assessment and evaluation of research studies on Bone Cement.


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07

BCS

Biphasic Calcium Sulfate as 2nd generation technological breakthrough in the long history of CS bone regeneration

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08

FAQ

Do you have a question about Bone Cements? your answer is probably here.
 
 
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09

The Logic Behind

Why flap with tension? Why no membranes? How come maximal closure is acceptable?                                                                               

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Intro Course

Free
bond

Augma Bond Apatite® Intro Course

The course is aimed to provide all the necessary information to smoothly transition to Augma bone cement from traditional grafting and shorten the learning curve to minimal.

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Webinars

Free

Dr. Stéphane Berg – Sinus Lift – 1 CE

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Dr. Amos Yahav – Lateral Ridge Augmentation – 2 CE

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Dr. Amos Yahav – Socket Preservation – 1 CE

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Clinical Cases

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FAQ

What am I supposed to see in an x-ray while working with 3D Bond™?

When 3D Bond™ is used on its own, the material is completely resorbed and replaced by the patient’s own bone, which is apparent while viewing an x-ray.

Approximately a week post-operation, a radiolucent shading in the circumference can be noticed in an x-ray. This shading will expand up to the fourth week when the entire area will be completely radiolucent. It seems as though the material has completely disappeared, but this is not the case. This is the un-calcified osteoid. Gradually, calcification of the area will take place, so that up to three months after implantation, the entire area will be radiopaque in the x-ray, with an identical appearance to the adjacent native trabecular bone.

Does Bond Apatite® remain hard during the healing period?

The material does not remain hard. The resorbtion process begins immediately after placement, while new bone formation simultaneously takes place.

Should one expect a different radiographic appearance with Bond Apatite®?

Due to the nature of the graft, the biphasic calcium sulfate matrix within the graft is simultaneously replaced by the patient’s bone; therefore, the radiographic appearance is completely different compared to other grafts, which always appear radiopaque due to their constant presence in the grafted site.

In contrast, the radiographic appearance with Bond Apatite® is as follows:

During day one after graft placement, it appears radiopaque.

Gradually, a radiolucent appearance takes its place (reflecting the graft's transformation into the newly-formed osteoid before its calcification).

Two to four weeks after graft placement, the majority of the grafted site appears radiolucent while few radiopaque spots remain, reflecting the presence of the HA particles. Within 12 weeks, radiopacity takes place with the appearance of the native trabecular form. This is the time when the new osteoid has already calcified.

There are ‘white’ particles three months post-op; are these HA (hydroxyapatite)?

The particles are the large HA particles that comprise the remaining 10% of the composition of the Bond Apatite® composite graft cement. At this stage, they are in the process of resorption.

Is there a risk of development of granulation tissue after using Augma bone graft cement?

Augma Bone graft cement is inorganic matter, and thus cannot form fibrous tissue. The cement dissolves completely. If at placement Augma Bone Graft Cement is not properly activated, placed and pressed into place and into a properly prepared host site, and if there is a removable prosthesis, or a movable flap or anything else that might interfere with graft stability, then the cement matrix might not hold the space and heal by scar tissue.

What is the histological difference between Augma bone formation and classic allograft formation?

The histology slides of Augma bone graft cement present new bone with osteocytes within the bone. This fact reflects that the new bone is vital. With allografts, there is an integration of the allograft particles with the surrounding bone. However, there are no osteocytes within the integrated allograft particles, which is a confirmation that those particles are sterile sequestrum and not vital bone.

What are some common reasons for finding less than optimum results?

Please keep in mind that Augma’s bone graft cement performs as well as under performs in different ways then traditional graft materials

  • There is no conversion to scar tissue- the biphasic calcium sulfate is not biologic and cannot covert to fibrous connective tissue like allograft/autograft/Xenograft.
  • There is no infection as a result of the material - the material is inorganic and thus will not be prone to the bacterial assault like allograft/autograft particles do. In addition, it is NOT particulate like other Xenograft/Alloplasts and thus will not harbor bacteria in its porous structure to infect the site of future implants. The biphasic calcium sulfate will, however, yield less then optimum results if surgical placement protocols are not followed.
  • Removable appliances are pressing and moving over the grafted site will cause graft volume reduction or elimination.
  • The patient does not follow postoperative instructions; will cause graft volume reduction or elimination.